A Rolling Stone Article...

Thursday, April 20, 2006

After reading this article by Rolling Stone: The Worst President in History? and similar articles over the past several months, I am dismayed at how this guy got elected to a second term.  The only thing I can surmise is that most of the American public are marketing fools.   They would rather believe the marketing than the facts.

A few points this article makes that echo several other points of view:
  • No previous president appears to have squandered the public's trust more than Bush has.

  • On September 10th, 2001, he held among the lowest ratings of any modern president for that point in a first term. (Only Gerald Ford, his popularity reeling after his pardon of Nixon, had comparable numbers.) The attacks the following day transformed Bush's presidency, giving him an extraordinary opportunity to achieve greatness…Bush wasted his chance by quickly choosing partisanship over leadership.

  • Bush came to office in 2001 pledging to govern as a "compassionate conservative," more moderate on domestic policy than the dominant right wing of his party. The pledge proved hollow, as Bush tacked immediately to the hard right.

  • History may ultimately hold Bush in the greatest contempt for expanding the powers of the presidency beyond the limits laid down by the U.S. Constitution. the Bush administration -- in seeking to restore what Cheney, a Nixon administration veteran, has called "the legitimate authority of the presidency" -- threatens to overturn the Framers' healthy tension in favor of presidential absolutism. Armed with legal findings by his attorney general (and personal lawyer) Alberto Gonzales, the Bush White House has declared that the president's powers as commander in chief in wartime are limitless. No previous wartime president has come close to making so grandiose a claim. More specifically, this administration has asserted that the president is perfectly free to violate federal laws on such matters as domestic surveillance and the torture of detainees

  • The president came to office calling himself "a uniter, not a divider" and promising to soften the acrimonious tone in Washington. He has had two enormous opportunities to fulfill those pledges: first, in the noisy aftermath of his controversial election in 2000, and, even more, after the attacks of September 11th, when the nation pulled behind him as it has supported no other president in living memory. Yet under both sets of historically unprecedented circumstances, Bush has chosen to act in ways that have left the country less united and more divided, less conciliatory and more acrimonious -- much like James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson and Herbert Hoover before him.


Wow…and we have another two years of this man.

1 comment

Granny Geek said...

Thanks so much for posting this. I tried to find a copy of RS yesterday, but couldn't. Guess I'll have to read it online.

Couldn't you just SCREAM? I got so mad the other day that I actually said "shit."

:-)

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